Most recent

Related image for Move over MANY 6160, Make way for MANY 2.0

Move over MANY 6160, Make way for MANY 2.0

The dynamic retail collective housed in the old Myer building has a new home. From March 2017, the eclectic pop-up with a difference is bringing new life to the old Spotlight building on Adelaide Street.

When it first opened in October 2013, nobody quite knew how long MANY 6160 (then known as MYRE) would inhabit the building vacated by the department store. Six months? Nine? More than three years later, the temporary concept store (a mix of retail and makers workspaces) is still busy incubating independent businesses. It’s part of an emerging trend in retail that shuns the bland, soulless shopping centre vibe in favour of a fresher, more experimental approach.

“MANY has been a huge, important and interesting project,” says project manager Kate Hulett of its first incarnation in Kings Square. She names the unusual nature of the building and the cooperation and flexibility of its owner Sirona and the City of Fremantle as contributing factors to its success. “Where else would you find 20,000 square metres of space to do something like this? And where else would this work but in Fremantle?”

MANY 6160 has housed an evolving line-up of retailers selling hats, artwork, vintage clothing, retro furniture, artisan lamps, jewellery and footwear. Its rooftop has seen two new bars, a couple of motorbike shows and at least one wedding. Its basement has witnessed everything from mini golf to an acclaimed art gallery to performances by Falls Festival DJs. Upstairs, furniture makers, costume designers, upholsterers, surfboard makers, metal workers and artists have toiled away on their own projects, in the company of like-minded folk.

It’s one of the hallmarks of MANY, says Kate. Unlike other small businesses where people work alone, the retailers and makers here can talk, connect and sometimes collaborate as a result of the communal space. As well as nurturing a vibrant community, MANY is a way for people to test their businesses without taking on prohibitive leases.

For customers, the benefits lie in the variety, the original wares and the accessibility. People can wander between shops, read books or enjoy the café without feeling pressured to buy. Kate sees it as a space where mums, grandparents, hipsters and teenagers can feel equally at ease.

Vacating the premises for the Kings Square redevelopment (the space will become mixed use office and retail) has brought a new opportunity: to reenergise another dead space with a new-look pop-up.

Overseen once again by Spacemarket, the Adelaide Street space has a similar vibe but a different look. Retail stores laid out on the diagonal, for example. The café (opening soon) will front both the retail floor and the outside lane near Westgate Mall. It’s hoped that regular events will take shape here.

The makers have embarked on a diaspora of their own. Some have moved to studios at the old Fremantle Police Station (cleverly renamed MANY 000), while others plumped for a warehouse at North Fremantle’s Matilda Bay Brewing. Others still are headed for East Perth.

In Adelaide Street, MANY’s retail philosophy holds. MANY 2.0 prides itself on being an outlet for hard-to-find, often handmade items that are unique to Western Australia, in a space that feels interesting and creative.

“It would be hard to manufacture the feel of MANY in a cold, new building,” says Kate, who has relished revitalising the derelict Spotlight store–which will be demolished within the next two years for new apartments–into MANY’s next temporary space.

“There’s no sadness in the closure of the old place. It’s exciting to have the opportunity to refresh.”

MANY 2.0 opens it's doors for business Thursday 16 March. Shout out to the project partners Yolk Property, Spacemarket & the City of Fremantle for unlocking another underutilised building and bringing it back to life. An official opening with all the bells and whistles is planned for Saturday 8 April. 

Ed
Read more

Most popular

Previous blog posts

Related image for Fremantle International Street Arts Festival 2017

Fremantle International Street Arts Festival 2017

The Fremantle International Street Arts Festival (FISAF), held over the Easter long weekend every year, offers locals and visitors alike an up close and personal experience of the world’s best street theatre in the most iconic and unusual of settings.

It’s all that we love about Freo, amplified by 100–the alfresco dining and relaxed atmosphere, the arts and culture, local characters and live performance in the streets.

In its 19th year, FISAF continues its evolution as Australia’s only dedicated street theatre festival, bringing artists from the Netherlands, Spain, Hungary, New Zealand, the USA, United Kingdom, Canada, Lithuania, Belgium and Japan to be a part of the action.

For the first time this year, the festival will be running a full program of entertainment at the Esplanade Reserve and surrounding areas on Good Friday. The fabulous interactive tour, Romantic Botanic will lead people from the Fremantle Prison to the Esplanade Reserve on a journey through the love life of our local natural fauna. Specially commissioned for FISAF, the tour will run on Friday and every day throughout the festival.

The entertainment continues after dark on Saturday and Sunday evenings. As the sun goes down each day, the street heats up with lively bands, spectacular fire shows and crazy roving antics making their way among diners and revellers to create a carnival vibe.

Making a comeback to FISAF 2017 is the much-loved Busker’s Cabaret, featuring all your favourite street performers doing the salacious bits they aren’t allowed to do on the streets. Hosted by the outrageous duo, Daredevil Chicken and held in the beautiful Fremantle Town Hall with a full bar, it’s sure to be an over-18s highlight.

Possibly one of the most daring and hilarious acts of this year’s festival is the Belgian butchers, Boucherie Bacul. From their unassuming mobile food van, they will be carving up tasty treats without a joint of meat in sight. Spanish dancers HURyCAN will be pushing the line between love and exasperation in their piece Te Odiero and Witty Look present their Guinness World Record-holding cartoon comedy.

Quatour Stomp will be bringing their acrobatic skills all the way from Canada for the ultimate audience participation show, What’s Next? The roll of a dice decides which tricks form part of the show, meaning even the performers won’t know how it will play out.

Kicking off the entire festival is the ever-popular opening night at Fremantle Arts Centre. Select performers and musicians will be giving a sneak peak of what to expect over the weekend in the relaxed party atmosphere of the courtyard. It’s the perfect way to start four days of FISAF fun!

Fremantle International Street Arts Festival 13–17 April 2017. Check out this year's performers and download a copy of the program here

Ed
Read more
Related image for Spend the Easter weekend in Freo

Spend the Easter weekend in Freo

Fremantle International Street Arts Festival (FISAF), held over the Easter long weekend (13-17 April 2017), offers an up close and personal experience of the world’s best street theatre in one of Australia’s most iconic port cities.

Performers, hand-picked and direct from festivals around the world, descend on Fremantle, Western Australia, to present a rip roaring weekend of entertainment, mayhem, comedy, satire and lots of laughs.

It’s a long weekend of awe-inspiring shows from the outrageous and boisterous in front of captivated crowds right through to intimate performances for a few.

Between the two you’ll encounter roving acts that pop up anywhere and anytime; punk rock cockatoos in biker jackets cheekily vying for drinks, a plastic green army man come to life and giant sniffer dogs sniffing out trouble…

But absolutely the best thing about this Easter weekend is the vibe, and the only way to get that is to come and experience it for yourself.

The festival kicks off officially on Thursday 13 April with an opening night at Fremantle Arts Centre. It’ll give you a bit of a taster of what’s to come. For the first time there will be performances on Good Friday (14 April) at Cicerello’s Pitch and Esplanade Reserve.

With flights a plenty to Western Australia all you need to do is book accommodation on your doorstep to the festival. The team at Fremantle’s Visitor Centre know all the best places, or stay at the official festival hotel, Esplanade Hotel Fremantle–by Rydges, where you’ll rub shoulders with the FISAF performers. Use promo code PROMO17 for a special offer of $199 per night for the FISAF weekend.

There’ll be plenty happening every day and into the evenings but make time for an Indian Ocean sunset at Western Australia’s only beach bar, Bathers Beach House on Bathers Beach, explore the amazing street art (work) around Fremantle with a self–guided walking tour or hang out in the heritage listed West End Precinct at the West End Weekender with chill out zones, activities for kids, live music and the Easter Food Market.

Fremantle is a hip foodie destination and the variety of places to eat is mouth watering and eclectic. Take your pick from small bars offering delicious shared plates, restaurants & cafés serving up taste sensations with the freshest local ingredients like Strange CompanyRaw Kitchen, Moore & Moore Café, Bread in Common & Kazoomies on Victoria Quay and there’s plenty more to try. Have a look at our eat & drink pages for some more suggestions.

Not sold yet? Look out for our latest FISAF blog post for the heads up on must see acts or check the special events page for a full list of performers and download the official FISAF program. It’s going to be an awesome festival.

See you in Freo!

Ed
Read more
Related image for "Fremantle is a beautiful place"

"Fremantle is a beautiful place"

Fremantle is a special place for people all over the world but few of us understand its significance to traditional owners, the Whadjuk Nyoongar people that has sustained them for over 50 000 years.

The City of Fremantle has completed an important consultation process with traditional owners of Fremantle or Walyalup as it is known, that speaks about this significance.

The stories are told of the area known as Walyalup which means the “place of the Walyo or Woylie” or kangaroo rat. It’s a place of strong social, spiritual, cultural and historic significance to the Whadjuk Nyoongar people.

Walyalup (Fremantle)
Bidi (trails) lead people from inland camps to Walyalup where they conduct ceremonial and cultural business, hunt, camp and fish.

Manjaree (meeting place and camp) is acknowledged by the Whadjuk Nyoongar people as the place where trading valuable items and families of people gather for kinship and law making; where mothers, fathers, and old people get together; and where young men and women whom have ‘come of age’ meet future husbands and wives.

One of the most important bidi (trails) was the sandbar or limestone rock bar crossing at the mouth of Derbal Yaragan (Swan River). This crossing facilitated seasonal travel based on the Nyoongar seasons and for cultural and ceremonial activities.

Walyalup was a shared space between many Nyoongar people and was an important place of trade and exchange. It was also a place where Nyoongar people held their funeral rites.

The Nyoongar people had their traditional camping grounds in and around the area including on sites known as Fremantle Park, East Fremantle Oval, Tradewinds Hotel, Fremantle Cemetery, South Beach and Coogee Beach.

Walyalup Aboriginal Cultural Centre (WACC)
The cultural centre on Captains Lane in the Bathers Beach Art Precinct showcases Aboriginal art, culture and history. It’s a place where you can connect with Whadjuk Nyoongar people and culture.

The centre runs a program of workshops to coincide with the Nyoongar seasons including language classes, movie screenings, exhibitions, bush food workshops and art classes. Check fremantlestory.com.au for the latest program and centre opening times.

Dwerda Weeardinup (Cantonment Hill)
Dwerda Weeardinup, place of the dog (dingo) spirit, provides some of the most spectacular views of Fremantle overlooking the Derbal Yaragan (Swan River) and Fremantle Harbour. It’s located on the south side of the river at the intersection of Queen Victoria Street and Canning Highway.

According to the traditional owners Dwerda Weeardinup is one of the seven hills of Walyalup (Fremantle) associated with the dreaming story about the Seven Sisters. This dreaming story is one of the widest ranging song lines in Australia that extends from the Central Desert to the West Coast of Australia.

Due to quarrying of limestone in Fremantle, Dwerda Weeardinup (and Clontarf Hill in the South) are the only two of the seven hills left, although other traditional owners say that the dreaming hills are still there and still connects people to their dreaming stories.

It is also associated with the Walyalup dreaming story about the Waugal and the Yondock. The story tells of Yondock, an ancestral crocodile that travelled down from the north, causing floods and disturbances, creating Wadjemup (Rottnest Island), Ngooloorayaup (Carnac Island), Derbal Nara (Cockburn Sound) and flooding the Derbal Yaragan (Swan River) with salt water.

The Waugal (rainbow serpent), guardian of the fresh water, smells the salt and travels down Derbal Yarragan to see what’s happening. With advice from Woorriji (a lizard) in a cave in North Fremantle and strength gained from a freshwater spring at the East Street Jetty, the Waugal fights the crocodile, bites off his tail and places the tail across the mouth of the river to prevent salt water coming up stream.

The tail is secured with hair from the armpits of the Waugal on the southern side of the river, and with toenails from the crocodile on the north side of river (the site where the Dingo Flour Mill sits). The rest of the crocodile’s body remains as Meeandip (Garden Island) and dingoes watch from Dwerda Weeardinup (Cantonment Hill) to make sure the spirit of the crocodile is not reunited with its tail.

Note: The information, stories and names in this article have been sourced from Statements of Significance for the Fremantle Area and Registered Aboriginal Sites prepared by Moodjar Consultancy for the City of Fremantle, March 2016. View the document document at fremantle.wa.gov.au/statementsofsignificance

Fremantle story
Read more
Related image for A taste of Freo | Chicken Kibbeh (Chef Kurt Sampson)

A taste of Freo | Chicken Kibbeh (Chef Kurt Sampson)

One of our team has recently tried this dish at Propeller and can verify its deliciousness. After such rave reviews we think it’s definitely worth a try at home. Thanks so much to Propeller for sharing the recipe.
(We think we’ve noticed a typo. Can you pick it?)

Ingredients (makes 20)

Outer layer

1 kg chicken mince
200 g cracked wheat / bulgur wheat
1/2 cup of water
2 tsp allspice
1 tsp cinnamon
good pinch of salt

Stuffing

340g chicken mince
1 finely diced onion
zest of one lemon
80 g chopped pistachios
125 g diced dates
pinch of sumac
chilli flakes to taste
salt and pepper

Directions

Outer layer

  1. Add water to cracked wheat / bulgur wheat and let stand until softened (about 20 minutes).
  2. Add spices, chopped onion, wheat and salt to chicken mince and mix until combined.

Stuffing

  1. Sauté onions in a pan.
  2. Add chicken mince.
  3. Once cooked, add lemon zest, chopped pistachios, diced dates, sumac, chilli flakes, salt, pepper and mix until combined.

Making the kibbeh

  1. Take about 50 g of outer layer mixture and flatten it out in the palm of your hand.
  2. Then take a good heaped teaspoon of stuffing mixture and place it in the centre of the flattened outer layer mixture.
  3. Fold the outer layer mixture around the stuffing mixture (making sure the outer layer completely encases the stuffing).
  4. Shape into a ball.
  5. Repeat until all of the mixtures are used.
  6. These can be cooked two ways; deep fried until golden brown or bake in an oven at 180c for 10–15 minutes until golden brown.
  7. Serve with tahini yoghurt, quick pickled cucumbers and radishes or plain yoghurt, tomato, cucumber and parsley.

Last but not least, serve it up with a nice bottle of Rosé (from one of Freo’s bottle shops of course) to go with it and just before you tuck in take an insta and share it with us #Fremantlestory.

 

Ed
Read more
Show all blog posts